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Aug 17, 2014 / 115,590 notes
Aug 13, 2014 / 62,119 notes

the-girl-without-ed:

permaniche:

amroyounes:

8 vegetables that you can regrow again and again.

Scallions

You can regrow scallions by leaving an inch attached to the roots and place them in a small glass with a little water in a well-lit room.

Garlic

When garlic begins to sprout, you can put them in a glass with a little water and grow garlic sprouts. The sprouts have a mild flavor than garlic and can be added to salads, pasta and other dishes.

Bok Choy

Bok choy can be regrown by placing the root end in water in a well-lit area. In 1-2 weeks , you can transplant it to a pot with soil and grow a full new head.

Carrots

Put carrot tops in a dish with a little water. Set the dish in a well-lit room or a window sill.  You’ll have carrot tops to use in salads. 

Basil

Put clippings from basil with 3 to 4-inch stems in a glass of water and place it in direct sunlight. When the roots are about 2 inches long, plant them in pots to and in time it will grow a full basil plant.

Celery

Cut off the base of the celery and place it in a saucer or shallow bowl of warm water in the sun. Leaves will begin to thicken and grow in the middle of the base, then transfer the celery to soil. 

Romaine Lettuce

Put romaine lettuce stumps in a 1/2 inch of water. Re-water to keep water level at 1/2 inch. After a few days, roots and new leaves will appear and you can transplant it into soil.

Cilantro

The stems of cilantro will grown when placed in a glass of water. Once the roots are long enough, plant them in a pot in a well-lit room. You will have a full plant in a few months.

great info… pass it on!

reblogging cause celery

(via happy-healthy-and-fit)

Aug 13, 2014 / 49,807 notes

englishpracticenow:

commonly misused words - learn the proper usage of these words to get your way up to any English proficiency exams - IELTS, TOEFL, GRE, etc.

(via happy-healthy-and-fit)

mulanlifts:

3 Different Rep Ranges for Strength, Hypertrophy & Endurance
There are three rep ranges that correspond to the three biomotor capacities: strength, muscle building, and endurance:
Strength training entails lifting heavy loads for low reps. Specifically, the 1-5 rep range is best for gaining strength. Powerlifters tend to lift predominately in the 1-3 rep range (i.e. heavy singles, doubles and triples) for their main lifts.
Hypertrophy training, or training to build muscle, entails lifting moderate loads for moderate reps. Often, 8-12 reps is cited as the best rep range for hypertrophy. However, I contest that the 6-15 rep range is more inclusive and accurate.
Endurance training entails lifting light loads for high reps. Specifically, doing more than 15 repsper set trains muscular endurance. Doing such high repetitions places trains the muscle fibers that are resistant to fatigue under stress. In other words, you get better at doing more reps of a certain weight, as opposed to getting better at lifting a heavier weight within a lower rep range.
How Long Should I Rest Between Sets?
How long should you rest between sets? It depends largely on what type of training you’re doing? Here are the basic guidelines:
Two to four minutes of rest between sets is recommended for strength training.
One to two minutes of rest between sets is recommended for hypertrophy training.
Thirty seconds to one minute of rest between sets is recommended for endurance training.
Consider Intensity, Volume & Frequency
The number of reps and sets in your workouts should take intensity, volume and frequency into consideration.
Intensity (or load intensity) technically refers to the percentage of your one-rep max weight used on a set for any given exercise. Practically, though, you can think of intensity as the weight’s “heaviness” (i.e. how heavy it feels, not the actual weight in lbs). High intensity workouts always involve low reps, and usually involve relatively few sets. Low intensity routines are the opposite.
Volume refers to the total work (reps x sets) done in a particular workout session. High volume routines typically involve moderate to high reps and more sets per workout. Low volume routines are the opposite.
Frequency refers to how often you train a particular muscle group or exercise, per week. A high frequency routine can have lower reps and fewer sets and per workout if it involves mostly high intensity training; or it can have higher reps and more sets if the intensity is moderate to low. Low frequency routines are the opposite.
This is not my article. You can check out the who article here 
Aug 10, 2014 / 1,958 notes

mulanlifts:

3 Different Rep Ranges for Strength, Hypertrophy & Endurance

There are three rep ranges that correspond to the three biomotor capacities: strength, muscle building, and endurance:

  • Strength training entails lifting heavy loads for low reps. Specifically, the 1-5 rep range is best for gaining strength. Powerlifters tend to lift predominately in the 1-3 rep range (i.e. heavy singles, doubles and triples) for their main lifts.
  • Hypertrophy training, or training to build muscle, entails lifting moderate loads for moderate reps. Often, 8-12 reps is cited as the best rep range for hypertrophy. However, I contest that the 6-15 rep range is more inclusive and accurate.
  • Endurance training entails lifting light loads for high reps. Specifically, doing more than 15 repsper set trains muscular endurance. Doing such high repetitions places trains the muscle fibers that are resistant to fatigue under stress. In other words, you get better at doing more reps of a certain weight, as opposed to getting better at lifting a heavier weight within a lower rep range.

How Long Should I Rest Between Sets?

How long should you rest between sets? It depends largely on what type of training you’re doing? Here are the basic guidelines:

  • Two to four minutes of rest between sets is recommended for strength training.
  • One to two minutes of rest between sets is recommended for hypertrophy training.
  • Thirty seconds to one minute of rest between sets is recommended for endurance training.

Consider Intensity, Volume & Frequency

The number of reps and sets in your workouts should take intensity, volume and frequency into consideration.

  • Intensity (or load intensity) technically refers to the percentage of your one-rep max weight used on a set for any given exercise. Practically, though, you can think of intensity as the weight’s “heaviness” (i.e. how heavy it feels, not the actual weight in lbs). High intensity workouts always involve low reps, and usually involve relatively few sets. Low intensity routines are the opposite.
  • Volume refers to the total work (reps x sets) done in a particular workout session. High volume routines typically involve moderate to high reps and more sets per workout. Low volume routines are the opposite.
  • Frequency refers to how often you train a particular muscle group or exercise, per week. A high frequency routine can have lower reps and fewer sets and per workout if it involves mostly high intensity training; or it can have higher reps and more sets if the intensity is moderate to low. Low frequency routines are the opposite.

This is not my article. You can check out the who article here 

(via fithealthyfuture)

Aug 9, 2014 / 460 notes
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(via skinnifer)

Aug 5, 2014 / 3,442 notes

eatmyselffit:

Infographic by me. Fruit is NOT bad for you. 

(via healthy--forever)